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Best Soaps for Eczema: Your Guide

Posted on October 12, 2020

Article written by
Max Mugambi

Your skin care routine may play a bigger role in triggering your eczema than you think. Some of the most common triggers of eczema are dry skin, stress, and irritants. Because soap is a common irritant, people with eczema often have to be careful when choosing what to wash up with.

Whether it’s for your hands or body, you’ll want to find a soap that gets you clean without aggravating your eczema symptoms, such as itchiness, dryness, and inflammation.

But what exactly should you look for? Is there anything you should avoid? Let’s take a look at the ingredients you should pay attention to when purchasing soap, as well as some MyEczemaTeam members’ experiences and recommendations.

What to Look for in Soap for Eczema

Standard soaps can be very drying. This is mostly because they’re made with harsh chemicals that deplete the skin’s moisture and natural oils. As one MyEczemaTeam member shared, “Soaps dry me right up.”

To protect your skin from eczema flare-ups, you’ll want to use a gentle cleanser that doesn’t dehydrate your skin. Here are a few things to look for when shopping for soap.

Syndet

The normal pH level of human skin is between 4 and 6, while the average pH of soap is 9 to 10. This difference means traditional soap increases the skin’s pH to a level that may worsen the symptoms of eczema. One study found that washing two times a day with a traditional alkaline soap caused damage to the skin barrier, leading to dryness and irritation.

To avoid the aggravation of eczema symptoms, the study recommended opting for solid cleansing bars containing synthetic detergent, or syndet for short. The primary ingredient of syndet bars is a nonsoap surfactant — a compound that lowers the surface tension in a liquid, allowing it to act as a detergent. Unlike traditional soaps, syndets have a neutral or slightly acidic pH, making them less irritating to the skin.

Syndet bars are a good choice for cleansing thanks to their mildness and hydrating properties — both of which are beneficial to dry, eczema-prone skin. In a separate clinical trial studying the benefits of mild cleansing with syndet for individuals with eczema, syndet was found to reduce the severity of eczema lesions, maintain hydration, and improve the overall condition of the skin.

Some examples of syndet bars that may work well on eczema-prone skin include:

  • Dove White Beauty Bar or Dove Sensitive Skin Beauty Bar
  • Cetaphil Gentle Cleansing Bar

One MyEczemaTeam member shared their experience using a syndet-based cleanser: “I’ve been having a good day with no problems and no itching. I’ve been using my Dove soap and body wash without perfume, and that has helped me a lot.”

Glycerin

Glycerin is an ingredient that counters the drying effects of soap by acting as a humectant, a substance that preserves moisture. Humectants are used in lotions, soaps, and even food.

Glycerin also actively draws moisture to your skin. You may have noticed that natural soap seems to “sweat” — this is because it contains large amounts of glycerin, which draws moisture from the atmosphere. It has the same moisturizing effect on the skin.

While many natural soaps contain glycerin, it’s important to note that naturally made soaps are only a good option as long as they aren’t heavily fragranced.

National Eczema Association Seal of Acceptance

The National Eczema Association (NEA) examines ingredients and testing data to determine whether certain products are suitable for people living with eczema. The NEA’s Seal of Acceptance program helps people with eczema and other chronic skin conditions choose products that are less likely to cause allergic reactions or exacerbate symptoms.

Even if you find a soap that appears to have the right ingredients, it’s a good idea to check whether the NEA has approved it for people with eczema. Or, if you’re having trouble finding the right soap, visit the NEA’s website to find products that have been tested and approved by the NEA for eczema-prone skin.

What to Avoid in Soap for Eczema

Now that you have an idea of some of the ingredients and properties found in good soaps for eczema, let’s take a look at what you may want to avoid.

Sodium Lauryl Sulfate

Like syndet, sulfates are surfactants, meaning they attract both oil and water. Because of this, they’re commonly found as foaming agents in soaps, as well as shampoos and detergents. Sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) is one particular type of sulfate.

Unfortunately, while they’re good at cleansing, sulfates can also strip the skin’s natural oils. This causes dry skin, irritation, and sometimes allergic reactions — even in skin not affected by eczema. Therefore, it may be a good idea to opt for sulfate-free soaps for eczema-prone skin.

Fragrance

More than 2,500 different types of chemicals can go into making a fragrance. Because of this, manufacturers often just list “perfume” in their ingredients. This makes it hard to pinpoint the specific chemicals in a soap that may cause irritation.

It’s estimated that 1 percent to 4 percent of the general population is sensitive to fragrances, while as many as 15 percent of people with contact dermatitis have fragrance sensitivities. As one MyEczemaTeam member noted, “I’ve found that scented soaps, detergents, etc., can be very irritating to my eczema.” For this reason, it may be safer to opt for soaps with their ingredients listed — so you know exactly what you’re getting. You could even avoid fragranced products entirely.

Over-the-Counter Soaps for Eczema

If you’re looking for a face cleanser, body wash, or hand soap that will hydrate your skin without aggravating eczema symptoms, the following nonprescription options have been formulated with skin sensitivities in mind.

Dove Sensitive Skin Beauty Bar

This bar soap from Dove is made with a skin-sensitive formula that is free from irritating foaming agents, artificial colors, and artificial fragrance. The hypoallergenic formula includes moisturizing cream to keep your skin hydrated and prevent flare-ups caused by dry skin.

CeraVe Soothing Body Wash

With a formula designed by dermatologists, CeraVe’s body wash is made to cleanse and calm your skin. Ingredients include three essential ceramides, hyaluronic acid, and omega oils, which CeraVe says are intended to restore your skin to its healthy, natural state. The soap also has no parabens, sulfates, or fragrances and is accepted by the National Eczema Association.

Other SLS-Free Cleansers

Along with the above cleansers, the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology recommends these nonsoap cleansers for people with eczema because they’re free of sodium lauryl sulfate, which can cause irritation:

  • Aquaphor Gentle Wash
  • Basis Sensitive Skin Bar
  • Cetaphil Gentle Cleansing Bar

How to Protect Your Skin During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Proper handwashing is one of the directives given by the World Health Organization (WHO) to reduce the spread of infections, including the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19. However, as you probably know, frequent hand-washing with a skin condition like eczema can cause your skin to become dry, cracked, itchy, and painful.

The following tips from the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America can help you maintain healthy skin while protecting yourself and your loved ones from infection.

Wash — Don’t Sanitize

Increased contact with alcohol contained in hand sanitizers can irritate the skin. Hand-washing with a gentle cleanser is the better alternative, when possible.

Moisturize After Each Wash

Apply moisturizer after each hand-wash. Carry your moisturizer when you’re going out, and apply it immediately after washing your hands.

Pat Dry

After washing your hands, pat them dry with a disposable towel or tissue. Do not rub your hands dry, as this can cause irritation.

Wash Your Hands and Change Your Gloves

If you wear disposable gloves, the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America advises you to change them often and keep your hands clean.

Carry Your Own Soap

If you worry the soaps used in public places are not suitable for your hands, it may be a good idea to carry travel-size bottles of soap and moisturizer. Make sure to keep the outside surface of these containers clean to avoid spreading germs.

Members of MyEczemaTeam on the Best Soaps for Eczema

Many members of MyEczemaTeam, the social network for people living with eczema, have shared their experiences and tips on the best soaps to use.

  • “I have to stick with fragrance-free, and the more natural, the better. Check out Modere. It’s an online-only company that I refer [to others] all the time. I love their stuff, and they carry everything from laundry soap to vitamins."
  • “For soap, I use Natural Choice soaps. They are made of only natural ingredients.”
  • “Everyone is different, so you need to find the soap that works best for you. I previously used Cetaphil, but I’m finding relief with a highly emollient skin cleanser, such as Aveeno Fragrance-free Baby Wash. Others have found Dove or goat milk soap to work best for them. You just need to experiment and go all fragrance-free, moisturizing with an eczema cream or ointment within three minutes of towel drying after a bath or shower.”

Which Soaps Are You Using?

Have you found soaps that work well or affect your skin? Looking for recommendations on what has worked for others? Check in with MyEczemaTeam. There are approximately 32,000 members of MyEczemaTeam seeking and sharing community advice and support.

Here are some conversations about the best soaps for eczema:

Here are question-and-answer threads about soap for eczema:

Comment below or create your MyEczemaTeam account to join the conversation.

References

  1. Atopic dermatitis (eczema) — Symptoms and causes — Mayo Clinic
  2. Skin Care Tips for Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema) — American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology
  3. What's hiding in your soap? Four toxic ingredients to avoid — HealthyWomen
  4. Bathing and Eczema — National Eczema Association
  5. Skin pH: From basic science to basic skin care — Acta Dermato-Venereologica
  6. Cleansers and their role in various dermatological disorders — Indian Journal of Dermatology
  7. Surfactant — an overview — ScienceDirect
  8. Benefits of mild cleansing: synthetic surfactant based (syndet) bars for patients with atopic dermatitis — Cutis
  9. What soap is best for eczema? — Seatree Cosmetics
  10. Can You Use Glycerin for Eczema? — Dr. Cynthia Bailey
  11. About NEA Seal of Acceptance™ — National Eczema Association
  12. Eczema products — National Eczema Association
  13. Is your shampoo making your eczema worse? — Everything For Eczema
  14. Are my wash products damaging my skin? — BBC Two
  15. Clean hands protect against infection — World Health Organization
  16. Eczema, hand-washing and the new coronavirus (COVID-19): Protecting yourself and your skin — Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America

Max is a copywriter at MyHealthTeams. Learn more about him here.

A MyEczemaTeam Member said:

me neither...thanks

posted about 1 month ago

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