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Vitamins and Supplements for Eczema

Posted on December 13, 2021
Medically reviewed by
Kevin Berman, M.D., Ph.D.
Article written by
Imee Williams

Many alternative and complementary treatments such as vitamins and dietary supplements may benefit children and adults with eczema (also known as atopic dermatitis). Eczema is a skin condition that can cause itchy, dry skin that may ooze or weep, likely due to an overactive immune system and decreased skin barrier function. Eczema is more common in infants and children, who may grow out of the symptoms, although eczema also occurs in adults.

If you or your child has eczema, it may help to understand the potential effectiveness of certain vitamins and supplements such as probiotics and fish oil for your skin’s health. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved vitamins, probiotics, and fish oil as safe for general consumption. Still, these treatments should not necessarily replace the medical treatments or other therapies recommended by your doctor. Research is limited and studies have mixed findings — making it especially important to speak with your health care provider before adding vitamins or supplements to your diet.

Here’s what to know about the potential benefits and risks of vitamins and supplements for eczema.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D plays a crucial role in your immune response function, specifically in maintaining a healthy skin barrier. “I’m taking vitamin D, which keeps my skin smooth and moisturized to some extent,” wrote a MyEczemaTeam member.

Studies have shown that low levels of vitamin D in people with eczema are associated with flare-ups. Two trial studies observed children ages 2 to 17 years old with winter-related eczema. After one month of taking 1,000 international units (or IU) of vitamin D daily, the participants’ eczema symptoms improved. However, this study does not provide enough evidence to support the effectiveness of vitamin D in treating all types of eczema in children.

Studies on adults with eczema have mixed results. One randomized controlled trial in adults with eczema observed significant improvements in flare-ups after people took 1,600 IU of vitamin D daily for two months. Another study used 4,000 IU of vitamin D daily for 21 days and did not find significant improvements in eczema.

The use of vitamin D supplementation in children and adults needs further research to understand the ideal dose and duration of treatment. Although vitamin D is known to help regulate the immune system and the skin barrier, its role in eczema needs to be more clearly defined.

Potential Risks of Vitamin D Supplementation

Depending on a person’s age, the daily recommended amount of vitamin D is between 400 and 800 IU. Vitamin D can be harmful in large doses, causing nausea, constipation, and other issues such as kidney damage. Do not take extra vitamin D unless you are instructed to by your doctor.

Vitamin D can also interact with some medications, such as certain steroids or heart medications.

Vitamin C

Vitamin C is found in many foods such as citrus fruits and potatoes, and is an essential nutrient for your health. This vitamin helps produce collagen, promotes wound healing, and boosts your immune system. Vitamin C can also stimulate ceramide production, improving the skin’s barrier function. One study found that oral vitamin C supplementation improved chronic inflammation and increased ceramide levels in people living with severe eczema.

Eating a well-balanced diet will generally provide you with enough vitamin C. However, people who have vitamin C deficiencies may benefit from the use of vitamin C supplements. Vitamin C supplementation is generally safe when taking 15 to 90 milligrams per day, depending on your age, sex, and if you are pregnant.

Potential Risks of Vitamin C Supplementation

Larger doses (over 2,000 milligrams) of oral vitamin C may cause side effects such as:

  • Nausea
  • Stomach cramps
  • Fatigue
  • Heartburn
  • Kidney problems (with long-term use)

Taking vitamin C supplements can also interfere with some medications, such as:

  • Hormone medications
  • Chemotherapy drugs
  • Statins and niacin
  • Antiviral drugs
  • Blood thinners

If you’re thinking of adding vitamin C supplements to your diet, remember to consult with your doctor or dermatologist and discuss any medications you are currently taking. Although topical vitamin C-containing products have antioxidant properties, which help fight sun damage and aging, their role in fighting eczema has not been well studied.

Vitamin E

Vitamin E is an essential nutrient that supports your skin’s health. It is naturally found in vegetables, vegetable oils, and nuts. In one study, participants with mild to severe eczema took 400 IU of vitamin E daily for three months. All participants reported improvements in their eczema lesions and itchy skin.

Scientists have found that vitamin E can decrease immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels in the blood. IgE plays a role in developing eczema and often occurs in high levels among people with eczema. Decreasing levels of IgE may help reduce symptoms of eczema.

Potential Risks of Vitamin E Supplementation

Vitamin E supplementation is generally safe in adults at a daily dose of 15 milligrams. It has antioxidant effects and has been shown to regulate the immune system. However, vitamin E can be harmful in large doses, causing side effects such as:

  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Fatigue
  • Blurry vision

Vitamin E supplements may interfere with some medications such as blood thinners, chemotherapy drugs, statins, niacin, and vitamin K. Vitamin E may be associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer. Vitamin E may also increase the risk of heart attack or stroke in people with a history of heart disease. People with diabetes, liver disease, bleeding disorders, vitamin K deficiency, or cancer should consult their health care provider before adding probiotic supplements to their diet.

Probiotics

Probiotics are live microorganisms that you can consume as a supplement or in various fermented foods. Consuming probiotics can help stimulate the growth of healthy gut bacteria to boost the immune system and control allergies, especially in children.

Maternal probiotic supplementation means that a child’s mother took probiotics during pregnancy or breastfeeding. Maternal probiotic supplementation may have a protective role in the development of eczema. A review of more than 1,500 studies found that probiotics taken during the pre- and postnatal periods decreased the risk of eczema in children, including those who were at high risk.

Findings are mixed in children and adults with eczema who supplement probiotics in their diet. One study observed a total of 56 children ages 6 to 18 months with moderate to severe eczema. Those given the probiotic Lactobacillus fermentum twice daily had significant improvements in eczema symptoms. In contrast, a larger-scale study reviewed 39 studies in people with mild to severe eczema ages 12 months to 55 years. Researchers found no significant difference in eczema symptoms between people who received probiotics versus those who did not. At this time, it is not a recommended treatment for eczema.

Potential Risks of Probiotics

One study found that the Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG strain increased wheezing bronchitis in infants who had used probiotics during their first one to three months of life. More research needs to be done to determine the safety and effectiveness of probiotic supplements. In particular, people with weakened immune systems, serious illness, or recent surgery should consult their health care provider before adding probiotic supplements to their diet.

Read more about eczema and probiotics.

Fish Oil

Fish oil is essential for cell growth. The oil contains eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic omega-3 fatty acids, which have been shown to have strong anti-inflammatory properties. Fish oil also reduces leukotriene B4, an inflammatory substance that plays a role in eczema.

In one study, people taking fish oil had improved symptoms of eczema after 12 weeks. However, a study on infants with a high risk of eczema reported no difference in eczema prevalence.

Potential Risks of Fish Oil

Consuming too much fish oil may cause side effects such as diarrhea or nausea. In some cases, fish oil may increase the risk of stroke in people with a history of heart disease. Taking fish oil and medication such as aspirin, which reduces inflammation, may slow blood clotting. Fish oil can also interact with some blood pressure medications and birth control.

The Takeaway

Vitamins and supplements can improve eczema symptoms in some people, but what works for others may not work for you. Current research is limited, and scientists have not provided enough evidence to support vitamins and supplements as safe and effective treatment options for eczema. Further research and more randomized, large-scale controlled trials need to be done before health care providers can make solid conclusions and recommendations.

Meet Your Team

MyEczemaTeam is the social network for people with eczema. More than 39,000 members come together to ask questions, give advice, and share their stories with others who understand life with eczema.

Do you use supplements to manage your eczema symptoms? What tips do you have to share? Leave a comment below or start a conversation on MyEczemaTeam.

References
  1. Vitamin D — Mayo Clinic
  2. Comorbidity of Vitamin A and Vitamin D Deficiency Exacerbates the Severity of Atopic Dermatitis in Children — Dermatology
  3. Vitamin D and the Development of Atopic Eczema — Journal of Clinical Medicine
  4. A Randomized Controlled Double-Blind Investigation of the Effects of Vitamin D Dietary Supplementation in Subjects With Atopic Dermatitis — Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology
  5. Vitamin C — Mayo Clinic
  6. Role of Vitamin C in Skin Diseases — Frontiers in Physiology
  7. Significance of Skin Barrier Dysfunction in Atopic Dermatitis — Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Research
  8. Vitamin E — Mayo Clinic
  9. Targeting Immunoglobulin E in Atopic Dermatitis: A Review of the Existing Evidence — World Allergy Organization Journal
  10. Effects of Oral Vitamin E on Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial — Journal of Research In Medical Sciences
  11. Probiotics — National Institutes of Health
  12. Probiotics and Primary Prevention of Atopic Dermatitis: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Studies — The Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology
  13. Effects of Probiotics on Atopic Dermatitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial — Archives of Disease in Childhood
  14. Probiotics for Treating Eczema — The Cochrane Database for Systematic Reviews
  15. Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Probiotics for Primary Prevention: No Clinical Effects of Lactobacillus GG Supplementation — Pediatrics
  16. Fish Oil — Mayo Clinic
  17. Eczema — Mount Sinai
  18. The Role of Oral Vitamins and Supplements in the Management of Atopic Dermatitis: A Systematic Review — International Journal of Dermatology
Kevin Berman, M.D., Ph.D. is a dermatologist at the Atlanta Center for Dermatologic Disease, Atlanta, GA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Learn more about him here.
Imee Williams is a freelance writer and Fulbright scholar, with a B.S. in neuroscience from Washington State University. Learn more about her here.

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